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SurferJoe46
16-07-2009, 06:35 AM
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) -- A New Hampshire man says he swiped his debit card at a gas station to buy a pack of cigarettes and was charged over 23 quadrillion dollars.

Josh Muszynski (Moo-SIN'-ski) checked his account online a few hours later and saw the 17-digit number - a stunning $23,148,855,308,184,500 ($35,602,760,603,857,900.00 NZD) (or twenty-three quadrillion, one hundred forty-eight trillion, eight hundred fifty-five billion, three hundred eight million, one hundred eighty-four thousand, five hundred US dollars).

Muszynski says he spent two hours on the phone with Bank of America trying to sort out the string of numbers and the $15 overdraft fee.

The bank corrected the error the next day.

Bank of America tells WMUR-TV only the card issuer, Visa, could answer questions. Visa, in turn, referred questions to the bank.

pcuser42
16-07-2009, 09:20 AM
Is there even that much money in the world?

R2x1
16-07-2009, 09:37 AM
[qote]Is there even that much money in the world?[/quote]There is now. That fella with the eye-chart name has just had it credited to his account.

This won't be Visa or the bank, only the governornament can reach these heights. ;)

nofam
16-07-2009, 03:11 PM
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) -- A New Hampshire man says he swiped his debit card at a gas station to buy a pack of cigarettes and was charged over 23 quadrillion dollars.

Josh Muszynski (Moo-SIN'-ski) checked his account online a few hours later and saw the 17-digit number - a stunning $23,148,855,308,184,500 ($35,602,760,603,857,900.00 NZD) (or twenty-three quadrillion, one hundred forty-eight trillion, eight hundred fifty-five billion, three hundred eight million, one hundred eighty-four thousand, five hundred US dollars).

Muszynski says he spent two hours on the phone with Bank of America trying to sort out the string of numbers and the $15 overdraft fee.

The bank corrected the error the next day.

Bank of America tells WMUR-TV only the card issuer, Visa, could answer questions. Visa, in turn, referred questions to the bank.

I thought I was looking at California's debt for a minute then. . . . .:p

the_bogan
16-07-2009, 03:17 PM
No limits on the card?

wratterus
16-07-2009, 03:22 PM
A $15 overdraft fee. Classic. :lol:

Gobe1
16-07-2009, 03:50 PM
i want the interest that was accumulated over the one day, never have to work again. Actually neither would my sisters, brothers etc

Richard
16-07-2009, 04:48 PM
I thought I was looking at California's debt for a minute then. . . . .:p

Don't think it will be too far away by the time the Governator sorts out his problems. :thumbs:

johcar
16-07-2009, 04:53 PM
Sounds like the stuff of urban myths....

This is (allegedly) a debit card issued in conjunction with Visa and linked to the customer's bank account. Visa have nothing to do with the authorisation process, other than providing a medium (not the psychic kind!) for the bank to use.

The bank would (should) have checks and balances to prevent this sort of dumb (or deliberate) mistake happening. Even if they are offline, there would normally be a limit over which the merchant would have to ring for authorisation, or turn the customer away.

If this story is true, it sounds like exceedingly crappy automated systems in place at the bank.

The Hitcher
16-07-2009, 05:12 PM
A bit OT. I once invoiced a customer $9 billion for the delivery of a second-hand server. I was scanning a barcode product number during the server decommissioning process but had knocked a mouse button or something and that shifted the scan details to a delivery schedule. The customer was actually amused, though I was acutely embarrassed. I watch the screen like a hawk now.