PDA

View Full Version : inkjet printer



stevlena
18-06-2009, 11:06 PM
Can I use Transparency Film For Plain Paper Copiers in an Inkjet Home Printer?
Someone please help! These are cheaper than buying the 3M Inkjet Transparencies - but I don't want to mess my printer heads up! I'm only printing in black & white.

Jayess64
19-06-2009, 12:10 AM
Can I use Transparency Film For Plain Paper Copiers in an Inkjet Home Printer?
Someone please help! These are cheaper than buying the 3M Inkjet Transparencies - but I don't want to mess my printer heads up! I'm only printing in black & white.

Don't do it! The transparency film must be suitable for inkjet printing, otherwise the ink will smear. For example, I can use Mitsubishi Chemical transparency film with my Canon iP4500 inkjet printer, and in fact it should work with just about any inkjet.

The important thing is, check the packet before you buy. It should clearly indicate that the film is meant for inkjets. You should be able to find it at most office supplies, eg Warehouse Stationery.

And yes, it isn't cheap!

GR8Metal
19-06-2009, 09:44 AM
I agree with Jayess64, don't do it! I've seen the results using transparency paper intended for copiers on an inkjet...very messy! I've also seen people try and use transparency paper for inkjets on a copier...goes in. . .doesn't come out! Melted in the heat transfer roller!!

Paul.Cov
20-06-2009, 09:23 AM
(sigh) I've been through this same dilemma. Inkjets need a plastic with a porous surface - so that the ink physically penetrates into the plastic - otherwise it'll be smudge-city, and a mess any time a warm moist finger touches the plastic.

The porous sheets have ONE SIDE ONLY treated in this way - so you also have to take care to load the sheets the right way around.
You can tell the treated side by the matt finish - as opposed to the glossy back side.

Laser (thermal) printers on the other hand need a plastic that can handle the heat of the fusers.

Lesson learnt the hard way - trying to print logos onto window envelopes - the plastic window melts in a laser printer. D'oh!