Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    26

    Default Track down incoming numbers in landline

    Does anyone know how to track down any incoming numbers calling to your landline ? I have family issue that I need to sort out the incoming numbers from overseas which I'm using Vodafone wireless landline. Is any kind of service provided in NZ telecommunication ?

  2. #2
    Smiling Down On Youse SurferJoe46's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Montana, USA
    Posts
    12,844

    Default Re: Track down incoming numbers in landline

    "Track-down" in the US usually means to "go after, procure for self the pelts, hide or tusks of poor defenseless animals for the remuneration of same, pending commerce and trade to the (indigenous) Indian people or white settlers."

    Who or whom do you want to track down? Is there any chance that you are starting a new fashion statement with human pelts, hides or tusks?

    I wear a 40-Regular, 34 inch inseam, 16 inch collar.
    The problem with going to the stars is only the first few hundred miles.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    26

    Default Re: Track down incoming numbers in landline

    Quote Originally Posted by SurferJoe46 View Post
    "Track-down" in the US usually means to "go after, procure for self the pelts, hide or tusks of poor defenseless animals for the remuneration of same, pending commerce and trade to the (indigenous) Indian people or white settlers."

    Who or whom do you want to track down? Is there any chance that you are starting a new fashion statement with human pelts, hides or tusks?

    I wear a 40-Regular, 34 inch inseam, 16 inch collar.
    lolz english is not my 1st language so how would you say ?

  4. #4
    Smiling Down On Youse SurferJoe46's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Montana, USA
    Posts
    12,844

    Default Re: Track down incoming numbers in landline

    Oh..."track down" is OK enough, but it just conjures up some interesting mental images for me.

    Maybe OTHERS are not as affected as the 9-out-of-10 voices in my head who/whom found it entertaining.
    The problem with going to the stars is only the first few hundred miles.

  5. #5
    Misc. User of PressF1 somebody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    5,198

    Default Re: Track down incoming numbers in landline

    Just call your telecommunications provider (Telecom, Vodafone, or whoever it is that you use). They are usually quite helpful with dealing with nuisance phone calls.
    Any views expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent the views of my employer or any affiliated 3rd party.

  6. #6
    Old dick-head
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    between Lower Hutt & Carterton
    Posts
    943

    Default Re: Track down incoming numbers in landline

    if you are with Telecom, caller display is what you want.
    http://www.telecom.co.nz/callerdisplay

  7. #7
    Bleakly Optomistic
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Wellington, NZ
    Posts
    1,288

    Default Re: Track down incoming numbers in landline

    Quote Originally Posted by decibel View Post
    if you are with Telecom, caller display is what you want.
    http://www.telecom.co.nz/callerdisplay
    Still doesn't help if the other end has paid to hide their number.

  8. #8
    Peripatetic member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Dunedin & Central Otago
    Posts
    2,795

    Default Re: Track down incoming numbers in landline

    I don't think you have to pay to keep your number from showing on Caller Display, do you?
    Certainly when it first came in, you simply had to ask for it to be kept private. Anyone's entitled to do that, I believe.
    You do have to pay for an unlisted number, but that's not the same thing.

  9. #9
    Smiling Down On Youse SurferJoe46's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Montana, USA
    Posts
    12,844

    Default Re: Track down incoming numbers in landline

    Looks like NZ is 'way behind the curve on this one.

    In the US we can block our number from being read/seen by the party we call - except for police and other authorities. It's called "Caller ID Blocking".

    We dial a three digit code (*67) and from that point on, we are in stealth or blocked.

    We can also dial another three-digit code and make it so our phone will not accept any stealthed calls and the phone company plays a recording telling the stealthed caller that they must temporarily release their stealth mode for this one call by dialing a different stealth release code.

    The phone company is working on blocking calls in a certain number-bank range too, as we get a lot of 800- and 900- area code read-outs that get through.

    I screen all my calls by staying stealthed-out (ID-BLOCKED) and make a recorded demand for release on all calls coming in or they don't get through. It's all handled by the phone company and I don't have to do a thing once it's set into motion.

    I can change the system any- and as many- times as I want to by using my code ------------- and it's free.

    The recording goes something like this: "The party's number you have dialed will not accept your call since you are not sending your phone number. If you want to call this party you must release your number by pressing the POUND-KEY plus XX" (#XX) before you dial the number again."

    We get "Call-Waiting/Caller ID" so that when we are on a call and another call comes in, we get a small beep in our ear and the new called ID is shown in the display window. We can switch over to that call, placing the original call on HOLD or not.

    We can place both callers on the same three-way call and talk to both at the same time as in a conference call. For free too.

    Telemarketing organizations however, often spoof our caller ID system.

    In some instances, this is done to provide a "central number" for consumers to call back, such as an 800 number, rather than having consumers call back the outbound call center where the call actually originated.

    However, some telemarketers block or fraudulently spoof caller ID to prevent being traced. It is against United States federal law for telemarketers to block or to send false caller ID.

    Individuals can bring civil suits and the FCC can fine companies or individuals that are illegally spoofing or blocking their caller ID.

    We get calls from "UNKNOWN CALLER @ 888-345-6789" or so and we know it's a sales call. The 800-bank of numbers and even 900-banks are all telemarketers. BUT we are now seeing PRIVATE CALLER, with no number displayed so we know to not answer anyway. Sometimes we see "NEW YORK and no number. I normally iggy those too.

    One small problem is that cell phones in/from a different service (as in a different WWW ISP: called POTS) cannot report their phone numbers at all and we just get the state of origination of that call.

    The WIKI:
    n the United States, caller ID information is sent to the called party by the telephone switch as an analog data stream (similar to data passed between two modems), using Bell 202 modulation between the first and second rings, while the telephone unit is still on hook. If the telephone call is answered too quickly after the first ring, caller ID information will not be transmitted to the recipient. There are two types of caller ID, number only and name+number. Number only caller ID is called Single Data Message Format (SDMF), which provides the caller's telephone number, the date and time of the call. Name+number caller ID is called Multiple Data Message Format (MDMF), which in addition to the information provided by SDMF format, can also provide the directory listed name for the particular number. Caller ID readers which are compatible with MDMF can also read the simpler SDMF format, but an SDMF caller ID reader will not recognize an MDMF data stream, and will act as if there is no caller ID information present, e.g. as if the line is not equipped for caller ID.
    Instead of sending the caller ID in between the first and second ring, some systems use a "line reversal" to announce the caller ID, or caller ID signals are simply sent without any announcement. Instead of Bell 202, the European alternative V.23 is sometimes used, (without the 75 baud reverse channel) or the data is sent using DTMF signalling.
    In general, CID as transmitted from the origin of the call is only the calling party's 10-digit phone number. The calling party name is added by the consumer's terminating central office if the consumer has subscribed to that service. Calling name delivery is not automatic. An SS7 (or Signaling System 7) TCAP query must be launched by the called party's central office to retrieve the information for Calling Name delivery to the caller ID equipment at the consumer's location. Canadian systems automatically send the calling name with the call set up and routing information at the time of the call.
    To look up the name associated with a phone number, the carrier in some instances has to access that information from a third-party database and some database providers charge a small fee for each access to such databases. To avoid such charges, some carriers will report the name as "unavailable", or will report the name as "(city), (state)" based on the phone number, particularly for wireless callers. For 800 numbers, they may report a string such as TOLLFREE NUMBER if the name is not available in a database.
    The problem with going to the stars is only the first few hundred miles.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Track down incoming numbers in landline

    Quote Originally Posted by Laura View Post
    I don't think you have to pay to keep your number from showing on Caller Display, do you?
    Certainly when it first came in, you simply had to ask for it to be kept private. Anyone's entitled to do that, I believe.
    You do have to pay for an unlisted number, but that's not the same thing.
    My number is unlisted and therefore withheld. I do not pay extra for that.

    As far as tracking nuisance calls it is, as somebody has said, fairly easy for your provider to do. Because everything is computerised these days, it takes a matter of minutes to check the records. Unfortunately it still takes a matter of many days before your records are checked. Nevertheless, ask your provider to chase it up for you.
    It is better to wear out than to rust out.
    - Richard Chamberlain, Tour of the Hebrides

    Us husbands are a sorry lot.

    Visit the Radio Reading Service: www.radioreading.org.nz

Similar Threads

  1. Do I need a landline to have broadband?
    By kettles in forum PC World Chat
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 14-06-2009, 08:47 PM
  2. Internet Alternatives with no Landline in NP?
    By Daniel.Drache in forum PressF1
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-03-2007, 07:38 AM
  3. IHUGs Landline Service on Monday
    By pctek in forum PC World Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 28-09-2006, 12:51 PM
  4. Landline fault - 7 day wait.
    By bazmeister in forum PC World Chat
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-06-2006, 09:34 PM
  5. landline to mobile
    By heni72847 in forum PC World Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27-10-2005, 08:17 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •