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Thread: Hemet

  1. #1
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    Default Hemet

    Joe, whats the buildings near the airport, north I think.

    Looks like a housing estate but all the buildings are very much the same size and shape. Got a lake in the middle.

  2. #2
    Retired old codger kenj's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hemet

    Looks like a retirement village on steroids.

    Looks like there is another one just to the right (and up a bit) of the airport.

    Ken
    Last edited by kenj; 18-07-2009 at 11:28 AM.
    Related to the Queen - by Corgi

  3. #3
    Smiling Down On Youse SurferJoe46's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hemet

    I think you're looking at the mobile home park in which my father lives. It's called; "Hemet West MHP". It's right next to the runway, as he likes planes. I think he really doesn't like them (airplanes)- he just can't hear them any longer so he has nothing over which to complain. He still complains - but not about the planes and their noise.

    You may not see it for a while (G-Maps/G-Earth refreshes just every so often) but there's a major shopping center going in directly to the North of the park, across Florida Street (the big black thing that is on the North of the MHP) and then all the really old folks will be there in the FREE Air Conditioning all day long instead of sucking up kilowatts from their own meters keeping their own homes AC-cool.

    The "lakes" are really ponds that they stock with bass and catfish for the duffers who cannot hold a golf club any longer - to sit on the banks and "fish" using their prosthetic fishing pole holders, surgically attached to their chest - which means they try to not die of heart failure or kidney stones while they are thrown outside of the house by their wives (if they are alive yet) or their "girlfriends" if the OE wife is gone (deceased) and they are now living in Cardinal Sin, as they don't marry so they can keep TWO Social Security checks coming instead of one for a normal married couple.

    It's a cute place as far as it goes and it's one of the nicer parks in the area - but it's too structured for me and besides - it's not a family park and is restricted to "Over-55" only people. <Hey! I'M over 55 now!>.

    Whatswiththat?

    PS: If you read that link (above) propaganda, ask me any questions you want as I know the smog levels (as it states) "are the lowest of the surrounding areas" - which means that even though there are multiple deaths across the street or less than 1/4 mile away, that the average death from asphyxiation and oxygen deprivation IN THE ACTUAL PARK are few and far between.

    Truth be known: when someone exhibits COPD or pneumonia-symptoms, the manager has a team of assistants driving stealth electric carts 24/7/365 who escort the offending person out of the park and off the grounds of the corporation so they won't change the score of deaths-in-the-park since 1959. (Hey Mister! Looks like you can use a ride - youse know what we mean?)

    Deaths at the bus stop and on the curb of Florida Street, right in front of the park have had a really big spike in occurrences in the past 20 years or so since this policy was commenced.
    The problem with going to the stars is only the first few hundred miles.

  4. #4
    Smiling Down On Youse SurferJoe46's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hemet

    Quote Originally Posted by kenj View Post
    Looks like a retirement village on steroids.

    Looks like there is another one just to the right (and up a bit) of the airport.

    Ken
    There are so-o-o many MHPs in the area, that they say most of Hemet can move away in just 10 hours and leave the place a ghost town if all the old folks get fed up at the same time. There are armed guards at the city limits to prevent that though.

    Ever see "Soylent Green" Don't eat at most of the older Chinese restaurants here.

    Youse guys looking for a warm retirement area?
    The problem with going to the stars is only the first few hundred miles.

  5. #5
    Cider Fan R2x1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hemet

    Quote Originally Posted by SurferJoe46 View Post
    There are so-o-o many MHPs in the area, that they say most of Hemet can move away in just 10 hours and leave the place a ghost town if all the old folks get fed up at the same time. There are armed guards at the city limits to prevent that though.

    Ever see "Soylent Green" Don't eat at most of the older Chinese restaurants here.

    Youse guys looking for a warm retirement area?
    Last minister I spoke to assured me a warm retirement area was assured for me.
    To make cider;
    Crush a large quantity of Apples,
    Smile :)


  6. #6
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    Talking Re: Hemet

    When kenj suggested it might be a retirement village on steroids I had this vision of all these old codgers sitting shoulder to shoulder around the lake edge holding fishing poles. Seems I wasn't far wrong from your descripion.
    Thanks for your enlightenment.

    When I lived in the States I visted a few trailer parks. Was hard to imagine they could be moved ever again. All looked fairly well rooted to the spot.

  7. #7
    Smiling Down On Youse SurferJoe46's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hemet

    Quote Originally Posted by tut View Post
    When kenj suggested it might be a retirement village on steroids I had this vision of all these old codgers sitting shoulder to shoulder around the lake edge holding fishing poles. Seems I wasn't far wrong from your descripion.
    Thanks for your enlightenment.

    When I lived in the States I visted a few trailer parks. Was hard to imagine they could be moved ever again. All looked fairly well rooted to the spot.
    Yeah - they are fairly well permanent once they arrive on-site. We call them "Mobile Homes" and not trailers. (Trailers are towed by your car when you go camping.)

    It takes a lot of work to move one again. Some are bolted to cement foundations and some are not.

    Jacking the individual sides up after they are re-separated and then adding wheels/axles/tires, lights, front hitch and securing all the heavy stuff inside is a very heavy job and requires a work crew and a full day to make the preparations.

    Ours is on anti-earthquake piers and seismic tie-down straps. It is 55 feet long and 30 feet wide with 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths with full showers and tubs. Weight is about 120,000 lbs/54.431Metric Tons/53.571 Long Tonnes (UK).

    All rooms are fully carpeted, except for the bathrooms and the kitchen for obvious reasons. The walls are gypsum-board or drywall as we call them with taped and mudded seams and I didn't want the rounded corner treatment, so we got the standard 90 angle corner and doorways. The ceilings are also dry wall.

    There is a formal dining room, a living room and a full kitchen with dishwasher, oven/stove (gas), refrigerator, counter tops and garbage disposal, overhead cabinets and under-counter or breakfast bar cabinets too.

    There is a full sized, walk-in pantry (dry/canned food storage, floor to ceiling or about 10 feet tall with full shelves and storage bins inside) and lots of extra appliance countertop space with ample electrical connex on three sides of the kitchen. There is also a ceiling fan and skylight in the kitchen. Bounce mini-tube fluorescent lighting and direct hi-intensity Halogen spots are under the cabinets and make it easy to fully brighten the kitchen while cooking and such. There is also a light in the central ceiling fan. All lights have dimmers to soften the brightness too.

    We have a full-sized laundry room inside too with a large washer and a drier right next to it, and the room is wired for 120/240 volt and has a natural gas outlet for our drier. We have the option of using gas or electric for clothes drying, but we chose gas. It's a lot cheaper that way.

    Overhead baker's wire shelves are all around the ten foot high upper areas of the laundry room for storage of off-seasonal items and also for cleaning agents and vacuum cleaners and other larger cleaning and household tools and appliances.

    We have large walk-in closets in every bedroom, a hallway closet and a woman's walk-in closet in the master bedroom. I don't get too many places to hang my things there as my wife is a clothes and shoe horse. In US terms, that means she has many/much/a lot of each color, style and matching outfits.

    It arrived in two sections and they were assembled on-site and then plumbed into the park's system and electrified the same way.

    Our insulation factors are: roof R40+, floors R22+, exterior (4-inch) walls R25. Interior walls (4-inch) are sound-proofed and also insulated, but not as heavily. All windows are triple paned for insulation.

    I have soffet heaters for ice protection factory built-in to the roof, near the drip edges and they are on a thermal protection detector with a manual override switch to keep ice from damming up and creeping under the roof shingles in cold climates during ice and snow fall.

    The ceilings are cathedral design, or about 10 feet high, dropping to 8 feet in each room. We have a three skylights and six ceiling fans all through the house.

    I opted OUT of having the fireplace installed and I have it in storage at a friend's home, some ways from here but I may put it in this next Fall for aux heating and atmosphere.

    We have forced air gas-fired heating in all rooms from a central furnace that is 95% rated with 4-speed blower and it has afterrun (delay) shut down to extract all the heat in the system, saving fuel.

    I have a 7-day, 4-season, 52-week digitally programmed thermostat for seasonal heating demands and a reserve "delay" to keep the interior from EVER dropping below freezing in case we are away and cannot set the temp as we want it should it ever drop near to freezing and we aren't here.

    State law also requires smoke and separate Carbon Monoxide detectors in all rooms and they are hard-wired with battery back-ups.

    Radon detectors are NOT required in a mobile home unless it sits directly on the ground and on stem walls and has limited under-coach air circulation to flush the radon out.

    We have evaporative cooler (not AC, but water evaporation-type air system called a "swamp cooler") on the roof and we get to below 55F pretty quick if the humidity is below a certain threshold. The humidity here can be single-digit, but it usually runs around 18-25% which is well within good evap-range and we stay nice and comfy all day.

    It's still over 90F outside and with the swamper running low, I am getting cold and need to warm up just me sitting here typing this.

    We are at a semi-arid high desert at 1600 feet above the ocean which is about a 1-hour drive away. The Summer temps can get to 115F/46.1C a lot, especially during this month and the next.

    We have distinct fire seasons (two) and we are in the very beginning of one of them right now. There is no "rainy season" to speak of, but it used to come about November to February every year. Not much rain any more.

    Winters here can get to freezing, although it doesn't happen much. Frosts can happen and we lose some gardens that way, but that too is rare.

    Snow has been known to happen here in years past, but not in recent history - say 5 or 6 years or so. Rain has also become infrequent, but we are watching some really big cumulus clouds form coming up from Mexico and if they get over the South-Eastern mountains, we will get some thunder/lightning and a lot of hail with high winds and torrential rains. IF, that is!

    We have had a few, small tornadoes. They are rare, thankfully.

    We get some serious smog from LA and Riverside. It's mostly nitrous oxide, but we can also see and smell some hydrocarbonous smog too at certain times of the year. It forms a nasty, brown-tinged layer of dirt and carbon monoxide over our heads, but it really is less dangerous and/or bothersome than the nitrous oxide.

    The valley holds the nitrous inside the three canyon walls of the surrounding mountains and since we are in a small depression or valley, the nitrous just "lays" here until the winds get strong enough to blow them to Palm Springs or we inhale the smog and purify the air that way with out lungs.

    The valley itself is pretty, but I like the higher mountains or the beach a lot better than this smog-laden area. Without smog, it would be like the Chamber of Commerce advertises: "Hemet is Heaven" (with earthquakes) .

    They lie a lot though, but not about the earthquakes! .
    The problem with going to the stars is only the first few hundred miles.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Hemet

    That was very very interesting thanks Joe. I can see from your description they are much bigger than the ones I looked at and why I was confused as to what they were on the photo.

    They are probably three times or more bigger than the little bach (Cabin?) I am staying while still a batchelor. (Hence the name)

    What is the advantage of them? They sound like they would be not much more expensive than a normal house. They are certainly well set up.
    I was interested in your heating and cooling. Soffit heaters are something new to me.

    Those swamp cooler impress me. We had one when I lived in Bakersfield. So cheap and effective.

    Thanks again for the description, I found it fascinating.

  9. #9
    Not a Key man Deane F's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hemet

    So what's a mobile home like that worth Joe? Compared to a, um, non-mobile home?
    Te audire no possum. Musa sapientum fixa est in aure.

  10. #10
    Cider Fan R2x1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hemet

    Well, with weather like that no wonder you are sticking to 115 volts. With full strength electricity summers could be pretty mean.
    To make cider;
    Crush a large quantity of Apples,
    Smile :)


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