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View Full Version : [OT] Going to rent a Rugdoctor, any advice / hints / warnings / tips / precautions?



Renmoo
11-12-2005, 08:50 PM
Greetings, the title says it all. My dad is going to rent a RugDoctor from New World on this coming Thursday. However, I would like to know if anyone out there has anything to say about this service? Is it worth the buck? Thank you for your time.

Cheers :)

Pauline
11-12-2005, 08:59 PM
Hi,
Make sure the water is not too hot. You can end up shrinking the carpet if it is too hot. You are best to also hire the upholstery tool as it is good at getting in close to the skirting boards.
Buy the largest bottle of shampoo as you seem to be forever filling the tank. The stain remover is good to get too if you have stubborn marks in the carpet.
Otherwise the Rug Doctor does a good job & it is easy to use. The handle folds down so will fit in most car boots.
Pauline.

wmoore
11-12-2005, 10:27 PM
Just to add to Paulines comments....make sure you give the Rug doctor a good clean mainly around the brushes etc before you return it.
(supermarket not happy when I return one)

pctek
11-12-2005, 10:49 PM
We used to hire them but it seems now its about the same price to hire someone.

Renmoo
11-12-2005, 10:49 PM
Hi,
Make sure the water is not too hot. You can end up shrinking the carpet if it is too hot. You are best to also hire the upholstery tool as it is good at getting in close to the skirting boards.
Buy the largest bottle of shampoo as you seem to be forever filling the tank. The stain remover is good to get too if you have stubborn marks in the carpet.
Otherwise the Rug Doctor does a good job & it is easy to use. The handle folds down so will fit in most car boots.
Pauline.
Thanks Pauline for your reply. Apparently, shampoo and any relevant cleaning liquid are supplied along with this RugDoctor rental. Is there a dial to adjust the temperature of the machine?

Cheers :)

Jester
11-12-2005, 11:03 PM
We hired one once on leaving a rental property and after spending ages going back and forth across the lounge, dining and hallway I decided that my time plus the hire cost and shampoo was more than what it would have been to get ChemDry in. The result was ok but it didn't remove some of the harder to dissolve stains.

We used Chemdry the next house and from memory was about $100.00. We have since used Chemdry again at our own home and were pleased with the results, and also removal of some ingrained stains that I am confident Rug Doctor wouldn't have budged.

Since then we've pulled the carpets up and polished the floors so no more carpet cleaning :)

If you have the time (it's a boring job) then it's cheaper, but the ChemDry result was beter than I acheived with the Rug Doctor.

Sb0h
11-12-2005, 11:11 PM
I have a few comments, I was a fully qualified Wools of NZ woolcare technician in a previous job.

Firstly, the temperature of the water should be hot. It will not shrink the carpet. There are four factors that directly influence the quality of the clean: Chemical, Agitation, Heat and Time. To explain quickly you can adjust one or more of these factors and get a reduction in the others. For example increasing the temperature of the cleaning solution (all other factors being the same) will result in the solution needing to be in contact with the carpet for a shorter period of time to get the same result. Most professional truck mounted cleaning machines will heat the water to about 80 deg C.

Be very careful of the chemicals you use. Most cleaning chemicals are on the alkaline scale of pH as this makes an ideal cleaner. However, wool carpets do not like high pH chemicals. If you can go to a local cleaning products supplier and get a neutral (or as close to it) pH detergent you are less likely to damage the carpet.

Use as little chemical as you can get away with. Excess detergent is the number one cause of re-soiling and results in a job that looks worse than before you started. As the rug doctor is a portable machine make sure you do a "dry run" when you finish to suck as much moisture out as possible.

Do not get the carpet too wet and make sure you dry it as quickly as possible. You can do this by opening windows and doors and getting some airflow through the house. Prolonged drying may result in nasty brown stains which will require specialist treatment.

Lastly, the number one tip for an outstanding job. Pre-vacuum!! Vacuuming before getting the carpet wet will remove about 80% of the soil held in your carpet. Once that gets wet it is a lot harder to remove.

:2cents:

Sb0h
11-12-2005, 11:15 PM
We hired one once on leaving a rental property and after spending ages going back and forth across the lounge, dining and hallway I decided that my time plus the hire cost and shampoo was more than what it would have been to get ChemDry in. The result was ok but it didn't remove some of the harder to dissolve stains.


As you have suggested it is worth noting the Rug Doctor is a small portable machine and as such will not get the result of a professional machine in the hands of a qualified operator. Carpet cleaning is a science and does require training for safe and effective stain removal.

Renmoo
11-12-2005, 11:32 PM
Thanks Sb0h for your excellent feedback and opinions on RugDoctor :D :thumbs:

Cheers :)

Sb0h
11-12-2005, 11:35 PM
No worries, feel free to PM me if you need any help or strike a tricky problem with your carpet.

:)

Pauline
12-12-2005, 07:34 AM
Hi again,
The shampoo & other bottles of potions are not supplied with the RugDoctor you buy them as extras.
I would still be careful of the water temperature. You wouldn't wash a wollen jersey in hot water they shrink if you do.
If you have stains to remove depending on what they are & how old they are too hot water can set them in.
Pauline.

gibler
12-12-2005, 08:47 AM
Heh, reading through a lease agreement I had it, it expressly says "Carpets must be professionally cleaned and this excludes the Rugdoctor". Classic. :)

Cicero
12-12-2005, 09:46 AM
Qualified Wools of NZ woolcare technician,
does that translate to carpet cleaner?

Sb0h
12-12-2005, 10:17 AM
Gibler - a lot of lease agreements now have that kind of clause. I did a lot of work for landlords and property managers and they don't want their carpets ruined by cheap operators and/or well meaning but misguided tenants. Some lease agreements may even specify a particular operator or industry association such as ACCI (Australian Carpet Cleaning Institue) or IICRC (Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification) .

Pauline - What you are saying with wool jerseys is correct. However, carpet is a totally different beast. For a start the jute backing on a tufted carpet (brown stuff glued to the back) provides dimensional stability. You can't stretch and distort a carpet as easily as a jersey and likewise you can't shrink a carpet as easily. Sure if you overwet the carpet for a long period and you also popped it off the gripper it might shrink back to its pre-stretched size, but water temperature alone will not do it.

Note: Temperatures should be reduced if cleaning an acrylic carpet (although not common in NZ, but may be present in floor rugs).

Shrinkage is only a real problem in woven carpets and that is due to the cotton used in the backing. When overwet the cotton shrinks and this force can be powerful enough to tear apart carpet seams and pop gripper right off the floor, very impressive and expensive :lol:

Sb0h
12-12-2005, 10:25 AM
Qualified Wools of NZ woolcare technician,
does that translate to carpet cleaner?

:lol: in a word yes.

Greg
12-12-2005, 10:36 AM
It's been years since I hired one, but it did the job adequately. For bad stains Nappysan is awesome - sure works well on the numerous red wine spills we've had over the years!

pctek
12-12-2005, 12:16 PM
I'm with Mr Carpet Cleaner. Its not more expensive, they do all the work and if its not right its their fault.
Much less hassle.