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aidanmaz
22-11-2005, 10:47 AM
i hav 120 day trial cd a tech from mi school gave me. I hav windows NT 4.0 server and Client. neither of them will install because the 2gb partition is too big apparently. it said something bout cylinders 1024k not supported. which i was very confused. so i left it

I have 120 day trials of windows . net server 2003 RC2 standard and RC3 enterprise, both of which need activation and will not activate watsoever. could anyone help me get NT 4.0 server or the 2003 servers working? i wud like to play on a server

Helplesss
22-11-2005, 11:36 AM
NT won't run on any disk over 2gb - only way around the problem is to partition off a bit of your disk and intall it onto that partiotion. Just out of curiosity, what do you expect to learn from playing around with this (old??) technology?

aidanmaz
22-11-2005, 12:08 PM
what do i expect to learn? well according to the tech at school, he recommended i start from NT so i can get an understanding of servers, that way i have a base to work from. as i want to be a computer systems tech, if i can undertand NT i can then move to 2000 or 2003. like i started from win 95 and moved up (98, Me and now XP)

and i like to know how the older tech worked so i can understand why they removed or added components.

If i partition NT on a 1gb parttion will that work? using XP's computer management, format into NTFS and what alloction unit size? default? 1024 or 512?

just playing round i earn experience and knowledge i guess

Graham L
22-11-2005, 06:23 PM
I'd be inclined to just use the XP to make a 1GB partition and leave it as free space. It's always safest to let an OS format its own partition.

The cylinder < 1024 limit is a restriction caused by early DOS/BIOS implementations.

Mark.p
22-11-2005, 07:37 PM
i hav 120 day trial cd a tech from mi school gave me. I hav windows NT 4.0 server and Client. neither of them will install because the 2gb partition is too big apparently. it said something bout cylinders 1024k not supported. Probably trying to install it above the 1024 cylinder limit. The installation program is 16-bit and can only handle 1024 hd cylinders IIRC. I believe the maximum intitial hdd installation size was 4 gigs too. The installation process switchs over to 32-bit mode once the HAL, Hardware Abstraction Layer, for the hardware has been loaded. It's been a while. What type of server do you intend to use it as?

Dannz
22-11-2005, 07:51 PM
what do i expect to learn? well according to the tech at school, he recommended i start from NT so i can get an understanding of servers, that way i have a base to work from. as i want to be a computer systems tech, if i can undertand NT i can then move to 2000 or 2003. like i started from win 95 and moved up (98, Me and now XP)
just playing round i earn experience and knowledge i guess
Windows 2000 or 2003 server are way easier to use - i would order a trial from microsoft (free including postage).

Windows NT is too old

Mark.p
22-11-2005, 07:59 PM
Dispite what the naysayers suggest NT 4.0 is still usefull. Some helpfull info here- ttp://www.windowsitlibrary.com/Documents/Book.cfm?DocumentID=405 Personnally I'd get and older machine to play around with it though or maybe use MS Virtual Machine software. Good luck with whatever route you take. Oh and ou maybe able to pick up an NT 4.0 server book of trademe or from your local secondhand bookstore.Take care

whetu
22-11-2005, 10:03 PM
I can name a handful of large household-name companies still running heavily on NT4 systems, so it's still a handy OS to know if you want to get into serious IT, and part of why I got my job in faults analysis a couple years back is because of my NT4 experience. I made life a lot better for a lot of people when I suggested dmacheck.exe, NT4 with dma enabled on the right hardware flies along damn well, as you'd expect :illogical

Although there is currently an exodus to newer server OS's due in part to mainframe\rack server EOL, you're still bound to find some legacy NT4 server somewhere, probably for some tricky legacy application (hey, anyone remember AS/400? yeah, they're still littering the corporate IT environment), or because the company cant justify the TCO of replacing it.

Hardware + licensing or Hardware + posix professional arent cheap, and if it aint broke, why fix it?

As much as IT professionals would love to be operating on the latest and greatest, there's a lot of political red tape to get through, NZ's corporate IT market truely is a slice of Dilbertonian hell, even moreso now that the big two are EDS and Telecom (gen-i)

FYI - If you do bother to install NT4, you will want to get SP6a, the latest SRP (both readily available from microsoft.com) and you will want to install IE4 (a little harder to get) before moving up to IE5.5\6. IE4 has a GUI update that will bring you from circa 95 to circa 98 - it makes life a little easier.

Mark.p
22-11-2005, 10:25 PM
USB drivers here= http://www.ionetworks.com/support/drivers/nt40/