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View Full Version : Holden Isuzu - Engines rev up and explode



george12
06-02-2005, 12:22 AM
Anyone have any information on this? A large number of Isuzu's have been recalled due to a fault that makes their engines speed up, be unable to be killed, then explode.

Picture this
You own one of these cars. Driving along on the motorway one day and suddenly, you start accelerating. You take your foot right off the gas but no difference. Slightly worried, you turn off the key, but the engine still will not stop. By now you are travelling at 150KM/h.

You brake, and slow down, but being an automatic it continues to rev up, slipping the bands. As you come to a stop, the engine revs higher and higher, the smell of burnt rubber strong from the transmission. As the engine hits and passes the redline, you decide to get out, put it in neutral and run.

And then it explodes. The diesel engine explodes violently. Lucky you got out huh.
[/picture this]

That was written by me BTW ;). There's nothing on the net yet, at least not indexed by google.

So yeah, anyone know anything else?

Basically all the news has told me is that they rev up, won't stop, and then literally explode. Something to do with diesel spilling into the engine I *think*.

Shortcircuit
06-02-2005, 12:52 AM
Well, I suppose it could be a 'little inconvenient'... may be a good way of getting out of a speeding ticket... just slap an Isuzu Bighorn badge on your 'Evo II' and hit the gas :D

there was something here about it:
http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3178182a11,00.html

vinref
06-02-2005, 01:39 AM
Their primary product has been blowing up in peoples faces (http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/gate/archive/2005/02/04/notes020405.DTL) with nary a recall or refund. Sorry to hijack your thread.

Anyways, I do doubt the "blowing up" of the diesel engine like you see in the movies where the occupant just escapes the fireball. Probably a collapse of the main bearings and valves striking the pistons like it did to my old Austin 1300 when I was barrelling up the Hunuas.

drb1
06-02-2005, 05:36 AM
Basically all the news has told me is that they rev up, won't stop, and then literally explode. Something to do with diesel spilling into the engine I *think*.[/QUOTE]

Compression ignition.

Fuel shut off failure and injector pump bypasss failure.

Simple fast cure, disconnect fuel feed line between filter and pump.

If you disconnect between line and filter engine will drain filter before stopping.

Unless it has allready started to suck the oil from the sump and burn it as fuel because it is overrevving, Common in Detroits.

Then it will:

A. Overrev, have a bearing failure, and seize, or piston strike head, bend and brake rod, hole in block failure.

B. Overheat and seize.

C. Snap a cam Belt and stop.

D. Run out of fuel and stop.

Can also be stopped buy chokeing air supply, no O2 can not burn fuel.

Diesel engines do not have flame type explosions, but there can be fires caused by hot oil and parts after catastrophic failures.

Isuzu should be at the bottom of the list of imported diesel vehicles to buy any way.

Intertesting seeing GMH still refusing to support the product golbally.

Another indicator as to why they are no longer a viable group to deal with. Unlike Toyota and Ford.

Billy T
06-02-2005, 12:39 PM
According to the latest newspaper report quoting Isuzu, the problem is not diesel engines at all. Apparently it is fuel injected petrol engines that have the problem and it is caused by compression-ignition of the fuel, just like a diesel and a modification kit is being suplied direct from Japan because most are imports and the local GM/Isuzu dealer network is quite naturally unwilling to pick up the tab.

I assume that the modification would be in part to kill the electronic fuel injection system when the key is turned off, not just the ignition; as well as addressing the defect that allows it to happen in the first place. Of course if it was mechanical fuel injection that would be another matter altogether. I don't know how mechanically injected diesels are shut down, but I guess it must be a solenoid fuel shut-off valve or some similar system.

The simple answer to run-on like that is to put it in neutral, coast to the side of the road, get out and and let it kill itself. The engine won't explode as such, but it might well mechanically haemorrhage a bit and throw a conrod or two before it stops.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Andrew B
06-02-2005, 12:55 PM
Regardless of whether the engine is diesel or petrol, if it has a manual transmission, the engine can be stalled by putting in 5th gear, putting the brakes on hard, and gently release the clutch until the engine stops. Might be a bit hard on the clutch, but better than a broken engine. But if you tried that with an auto transmission, then you'll end up with overheated torque converter real fast. Then you'll need a new transmission as well as a new engine. :mad:

tweak'e
06-02-2005, 01:15 PM
talking of enignes that won't stop.........

a local here had it once after his desiel ute had an oil change and to much oil was put in. it causes the oil to get pushed into the intake and the motor revs up, turbo comes on and its all over !

just remeber that the next time a gas station attendant puts oil in your wagon ;)

warren123
11-02-2005, 11:38 AM
Anyone have any information on this? A large number of Isuzu's have been recalled due to a fault that makes their engines speed up, be unable to be killed, then explode.

Picture this
You own one of these cars. Driving along on the motorway one day and suddenly, you start accelerating. You take your foot right off the gas but no difference. Slightly worried, you turn off the key, but the engine still will not stop. By now you are travelling at 150KM/h.

You brake, and slow down, but being an automatic it continues to rev up, slipping the bands. As you come to a stop, the engine revs higher and higher, the smell of burnt rubber strong from the transmission. As the engine hits and passes the redline, you decide to get out, put it in neutral and run.

And then it explodes. The diesel engine explodes violently. Lucky you got out huh.
[/picture this]

That was written by me BTW ;). There's nothing on the net yet, at least not indexed by google.

So yeah, anyone know anything else?

Basically all the news has told me is that they rev up, won't stop, and then literally explode. Something to do with diesel spilling into the engine I *think*.

You are right the engines do blow up my 16 month old 3.0 nearly killed me 2 weeks ago and getting it fixed isnt easy as Isuzu say that there is no recognised fault even though all new 3.0 engines have been modified.

Steinlarger Pure
24-04-2008, 12:04 AM
Anyone have any information on this? A large number of Isuzu's have been recalled due to a fault that makes their engines speed up, be unable to be killed, then explode.

Picture this
You own one of these cars. Driving along on the motorway one day and suddenly, you start accelerating. You take your foot right off the gas but no difference. Slightly worried, you turn off the key, but the engine still will not stop. By now you are travelling at 150KM/h.

You brake, and slow down, but being an automatic it continues to rev up, slipping the bands. As you come to a stop, the engine revs higher and higher, the smell of burnt rubber strong from the transmission. As the engine hits and passes the redline, you decide to get out, put it in neutral and run.

And then it explodes. The diesel engine explodes violently. Lucky you got out huh.
[/picture this]

That was written by me BTW ;). There's nothing on the net yet, at least not indexed by google.

So yeah, anyone know anything else?

Basically all the news has told me is that they rev up, won't stop, and then literally explode. Something to do with diesel spilling into the engine I *think*.


Its possible for any turbo diesel engine to rev up (run away) if suddenly seals in turbo give in and the engine runs with oil supply from the turbo

Renmoo
24-04-2008, 01:33 AM
If you put Steinlager into the wrong hole, the car would definitely blow up regardless of how it is being used...

Anyway, moving on after three years...

SurferJoe46
24-04-2008, 04:09 AM
I've gotta see this to believe it.

Engines do not just "blow up" with uncontrolled RPM.

The old Detroits (2-cycle, supercharged AND turbo charged) could go out of sight for RPM if they stuck the rack or the governor weights went haywire..but that's a totally unrelated situation to modern gas or diesel engines.

There are cases here where carburetted engines cannot handle the E-85 and other gasoline that is heavily ladened with methanol that won't run..especially restart after fueling up..but that's a different story too.

There WERE cases where the California Air Resources Board (CARB) mandated that Diesel #2 be supplanted with Diesel #1, which they considered an upgrade, and the Roosa-Master and even some Bosch in-line injection pumps seized and caused loss of "motivational capacity" to cite their lingo, and the state hadda replace the pumps and injectors when they were sued...but again, that is different too.

All modern engines, diesel OR gasoline, are computerized and they have limiters that will not allow things to get so far outta hand.

Some of the fly-by-wire systems could conceivably get crazy if the link between the throttle potentiometer signal got somehow "lost" and the computer thought the driver was calling for WOT...but again, that's kinda remote.

I think this is just another old woman's story and not very likely.

If there's a grain of truth to this rumor, then I'd be looking to poor fuel or bad mixtures in the refineries for a reason for a diesel to run away uncontrollably. Putting lighter vapor pressured additives in diesel COULD cause uncontrolled RPM, but not very likely on the scale cited here.

Residual gasoline in the delivery truck that also carried diesel could be the culprit...or a rather ignorant delivery truck driver could have dropped gasoline or even Av-Gas into a diesel underground fuel tank and that is getting into the fuel supply.

It might even be getting into the system at the refinery or tank farm.

If it's a gasoline-only engine run away problem, then there has to be some other mitigating problem that is common to Upsidedown Land only. :D

Ya gotta see the bigger picture here.

R2x1
25-04-2008, 01:14 AM
These engines are self-rectifying. None ever demonstrate the terminal smoke show twice.

dolby digital
25-04-2008, 12:56 PM
Always remember a story my friend told me. An old lady in a seventies Skoda pulled away from the traffic lights. The engine revved harder and harder and my mate thought that she must change now. Anyway, the engine blew up (much to his amusement) and it all when quiet. They just don't make them like that any more :D