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rmcb
22-04-2003, 06:24 PM
Is it possible to restore a original file if it has been overwritten with a file of the same name but different size??
Win98

Pheonix
22-04-2003, 06:36 PM
No :( not overwritten.

agent
22-04-2003, 06:58 PM
Might be, if it the sectors on the HDD weren't overwritten. Or parts of it.

Billy T
22-04-2003, 07:19 PM
It is not possible without professional help, but if you were using Word, you should find a series of temp files on your HDD and if you sort them by date, you may find a copy of your old file from the last time you modified it. I have twice recently recovered files like this, one on the same day, but another that was several weeks old. (Oh joy :D)

Do a file search for *.tmp and open each one that fits in your date range. I usually use ZTree for this because it lets you view the file contents then save with a doc suffix but you can achieve the same outcome in Explorer, it just takes longer. Good luck!

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Iris
23-04-2003, 08:09 AM
> It is not possible without professional help, but if
> you were using Word, you should find a series of temp
> files on your HDD and if you sort them by date, you
> may find a copy of your old file from the last time
> you modified it. I have twice recently recovered
> files like this, one on the same day, but another
> that was several weeks old. (Oh joy :D)
>
> Do a file search for *.tmp and open each one that
> fits in your date range. I usually use ZTree for
> this because it lets you view the file contents then
> save with a doc suffix but you can achieve the same
> outcome in Explorer, it just takes longer. Good
> luck!
>
> Cheers
>
> Billy 8-{)


Hi I recently had Word 2002 installed and am still getting my head around it all. Read the query about restoring files and thought I'd check what I could find using Billy T's instructions.

Found 132 files (including a letter I am currently working on) Apart from this one I don't seem to need the others. Is it safe to delete them?

agent
23-04-2003, 08:48 AM
I'd advise rightclicking on the drive they're stored on (most likely C: drive), and clicking the 'Disk Cleanup' button on the first tab. Tell it to clean up 'Temporary files', and then search to see if all those Word files have gone.

Billy T
23-04-2003, 11:21 AM
Agent's advice does not apply to Rik of course, who is still wanting to find a copy of the overwritten file. Disk cleanup is the last thing he needs right now. They are safe to delete but don't do it until you are sure all your files are safe and backed up.

BTW, I forgot to mention that the original file name will not show in the temp folder, so you have to open every file to find the one you want.

You can also search for *.wbk files which are Word back-ups. I just checked and I have 38 files dated between 4-7-01 and 15-4-03 sitting in that folder in my computer so again there is a good chance that Rik could find a copy of the overwritten file there too.

One further technique I use to find files or file fragments is to choose a word that is unique to that file (or a very small number of files) and do an all files (*.*) search for that word. It is surprising how often it turns up what I want. I haven't had the misfortune to overwrite any files but occasionally I misplace them when saving (or save without the file type on the end) and the odd one spontaneously self destructs.

Once again, searches are faster using ZTree (the free 32-bit clone of XTree Gold) and this program identifies every file whereas Windows searches don't always produce the goods. It does take a little time to get used to, however IMHO it is the fastest and most versatile file manager around.

Let us know if you have any success Rik.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

agent
23-04-2003, 12:05 PM
Sorry, I should've addressed my reply to Iris.

Graham L
23-04-2003, 04:46 PM
If you have Norton's Utilities, you could try: (1) rename the "new" version so it c\doesn't get in the way. (2) Try Undelete. "Overwriting" always (in almost any OS) makes a completely new temporary file, "deletes" the old file, and renames the temporary file to have the permanent name.

But success depends on how much has been written to the disk since the "error".