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sarel
23-08-2010, 08:22 AM
Anybody know anything about orchids. :help: SWMBO picked up an orchid bulb (?) about 8 years ago at a garage sale. The bubs have been living in a little glass bottle, in water, for all this time. I finally decided to do something about it and plant it out, but I know b*ggerall about orchids. Anybody able to identify an orchid bulb, or for that matter an orchid flower (because we've got another that flowered and I thought it might be the same).

From what I've read online it seems as if the orchid is quite a survivor - and if you consider my example, you can see that it is true

sarel

Sue
23-08-2010, 08:56 AM
http://www.ehow.com/how_5000893_grow-epiphytic-orchids.html
About the best one I could find.
S.

sarel
23-08-2010, 11:09 AM
Thanks - found that one too

sarel

Roscoe
23-08-2010, 11:14 AM
I have found that growing orchids is not difficult, they are just a bit different.

As I understand it, orchid plants in a bottle is an easy and convenient way to propagate and transport orchids.

As Sarel has said, I would suggest that you look online for instructions how to transplant your orchid. Make the pot reasonably large to allow for future growth.

They say you should use an orchid potting mix and orchid fertiliser. The former is true as there is usually many stones or pieces of bark in orchid potting mix to help with drainage. Orchids to do not like their roots in water.

It is not necessary to use orchid fertiliser as long as you have a good general plant fertiliser.

Orchids can last many years. Keep them warm, out of direct sunlight and, if possible, a humid atmosphere. They require little maintenance. Feed them every one to two weeks, water them every week and keep the soil moist. After watering let all the excess drain and don't leave them standing in water.

Don't expect them to flower often. Twice a year is about usual. You will notice a pointed growth (called a "spike") begin and grow. As it grows it will need support. Gently tie with a twisty tie. When they do flower the flowers will last quite a few weeks.

I'm certain you will enjoy the results.

R2x1
23-08-2010, 12:20 PM
Don't pander to parasitic plants, even if they are epiphytes! Treat them sternly, whack 'em about a bit; feed them every two years with a pinch of sand and gravel whether they need it or not, don't be fooled into using that expensive garden shop stuff.
We want to develop stronger, healthier plants.

When your garden is nicely bare, plant a beer garden. Hop to it.

sarel
23-08-2010, 02:22 PM
Thanks guys. Beer garden, yay.

sarel

BBCmicro
23-08-2010, 03:22 PM
Beer garden...

Where does one eat in New Plymouth these days? I've just booked 4 nights for the garden festival early Nov. Last time we found the red pub above the creek had closed (forget its name - The Mill perhaps) - now Breakers might have gone. We're not forced into Cobb&Co are we?

Roscoe
23-08-2010, 04:05 PM
Don't pander to parasitic plants, even if they are epiphytes! Treat them sternly, whack 'em about a bit; feed them every two years with a pinch of sand and gravel whether they need it or not, don't be fooled into using that expensive garden shop stuff.
We want to develop stronger, healthier plants.

While we understand that R2x1 is a bit if a comedian, there is some truth in his ranting and raving.

Many purists will insist on pandering plants, but my limited experience has shown that most plants will survive well with a bit of sunlight, water and food and not much else. As long as you don't forget about them but just show a little concern when you remember, most plants will do well.

If, on the other hand, you do look after your plants well, they will reward you with luxurious growth and beautiful flowers.

lakewoodlady
23-08-2010, 06:49 PM
Where does one eat in New Plymouth these days? I've just booked 4 nights for the garden festival early Nov. Last time we found the red pub above the creek had closed (forget its name - The Mill perhaps) - now Breakers might have gone. We're not forced into Cobb&Co are we?

Well, this is really in the wrong thread, however, I can recommend the "Stumble In", it is in Mangorei Rd by the Merrilands shopping centre.

LL

Terry Porritt
23-08-2010, 06:55 PM
Native orchids that grow in the bush are tiny and exquisite, and as R2x1 says, they are parasitic often growing in clefts in trees and off branches.

R2x1
23-08-2010, 09:26 PM
A neighbour got a bit fed up with tending his very expensive orchids and threw the lot down a bank under a patch of bush. They mocked him by thriving and blooming more profusely than they ever had. He's dead now, but the orchids are expanding and really enjoying their freedom these last 2 years.

PS, they are epiphytes, not parasites, they only get support from the tree, no nourishment at all excepting detritus.

BBCmicro
23-08-2010, 10:38 PM
...the wrong thread,

Yes. Sorry. But thanks!

sarel
24-08-2010, 08:14 AM
Eating in NP - damn, drive down Devon Street (the main street through town) and you'll see lots and lots of nice and cheapish eateries. Yes, the Mill has closed but will probably open again in the future (different owner). Stumble Inn is good but a bit out of the way. Really depends what you are wanting to eat. Just take note the local KFC is closed until end of Sept due to refurbishment (not that I care on iota).

Thanks for all the advice people. Last night SWMBO tried to throw the bottled orchid into the rubbish (I left it on a piece of furniture and it left a water mark) and it was just my incredibly fast reaction that saved it from certain doom. I will replant/repot it, probably over the weekend.

sarel