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John H
21-08-2010, 05:25 PM
Can someone enlighten me please? I notice some LCD TVs are advertised Full HD and others are HD ready.

What the hell does 'HD ready' mean? Will the TV grow up somehow and become Full HD? Is this some kind of con job? What else needs to happen to make it Full HD?

BTW, I am just looking for a second TV for the house - about 26", mainly for the grandkids to use if we want to shift them out of the living room when we get sick of Disney TV or their usual DVDs blaring away... They will be using it for DVDs and Freeview channels.

Thanks for any help...

Agent_24
21-08-2010, 05:33 PM
Both should accept a Full HD (1080p) input signal but the difference is in the screen resolution, not what input it can handle.

Full HD means 1080p while HD Ready means only 720p

So if you input 1080p from say a Blu-Ray player into a 720p TV, you will lose some information, and the picture won't look as good as it could.

If the TV is small, 720p may not matter. If you care about quality or it's a bigger set, make sure it is capable of Full HD (1080p)

If you can get a demo with both running side by side with the same input, that should help you decide...

John H
21-08-2010, 05:47 PM
Thanks for that; I think I understand, a bit - well, I guess I understand the end result. Shove a 1080p signal into Full HD and you get 1080p screen resolution. However, if you do the same thing with an HD ready set, it will accept the signal but you only get 720p screen resolution.

In what way then is it HD ready? To my dumb brain it sounds as though it should be called HD Unready (or nothing at all) - if it cannot provide the 1080p resolution potentially fed in through a HD signal it can accept, then what is it ready for? :illogical How can you make it ready?

This set will be using a Freeview tuner (I will only buy one with a tuner inbuilt, and I understand that will be terrestrial usually), and a Pioneer DV355 DVD player which is probably 4 years old. So there won't be a 1080p signal (I guess), but I should 'future proof' as much as poss I suppose, in case I upgrade the DVD player?

davidmmac
21-08-2010, 06:08 PM
In what way then is it HD ready? To my dumb brain it sounds as though it should be called HD Unready (or nothing at all) - if it cannot provide the 1080p resolution potentially fed in through a HD signal it can accept, then what is it ready for? :illogical How can you make it ready?

A HD ready TV can still handle an HD signal and will produce a picture of higher resolution than a standard TV.

Standard TV: 720*576 (Thats the resolution of the display)
720p: 1280*720 Progressive scan
1080i: 1920*1080 Interlaced scan
1080p: 1920*1080 Progressive scan

Higher resolution source = better picture



This set will be using a Freeview tuner (I will only buy one with a tuner inbuilt, and I understand that will be terrestrial usually), and a Pioneer DV355 DVD player which is probably 4 years old. So there won't be a 1080p signal (I guess), but I should 'future proof' as much as poss I suppose, in case I upgrade the DVD player?

Currently Freeview and Sky aren't 1080p - Sky & TV3 are 1080i and TV1 & 2 are 720p, but there is benefit in buying a Full HD tv as it can handle the extra million pixels.

AFAIK the main reason broadcasts aren't 1080p is because of the large bandwidth required for a 1080p broadcast - 50Mbps for 1080p compared to 14Mbps for 1080i (the rate which Sky broadcast at).

goodiesguy
21-08-2010, 06:10 PM
What is better? 1080i or 1080p? interlaced normally makes the words american and NTSC pop into my head, Progressive normally means PAL and Aussie/New Zealand/UK.

So, What is better?

pcuser42
21-08-2010, 06:13 PM
What is better? 1080i or 1080p? interlaced normally makes the words american and NTSC pop into my head, Progressive normally means PAL and Aussie/New Zealand/UK.

So, What is better?

From best to worst, 1080p, 720p, 1080i. 1080i means interlaced, which means only half of the lines are drawn at any one time. Progressive draws all 1080 lines at the same time. :)

goodiesguy
21-08-2010, 06:15 PM
I know what interlaced is, i have to set the de interlacing to "bob" on VLC for my dvds to play all the lines and fields properly

John H
21-08-2010, 06:29 PM
Thanks everyone. I still don't feel the name 'HD ready' makes sense, but I do understand what you are saying!

I think I have only seen one Full HD set available around the size I want for that room (26") - it is actually 27" - a Samsung SyncMaster P2770HD. Is Samsung a reasonable brand to go for?

Metla
21-08-2010, 06:35 PM
Thanks everyone. I still don't feel the name 'HD ready' makes sense, but I do understand what you are saying!


I find the marketing to be shithouse, Each set should just be listed with its maximum display capabilities,instead they cloud the waters as much as possible. Then they plaster there marketing crap all around outside of the screen.Its all bullshit, its a damn display screen,display something, don't give us 65 instances of crap.

I just bought a 32" LCD on Thursday night, The sticker along the bottom proclaiming all its brilliant features didn't even enter into the equation. And it went in the rubbish as soon as the set was out of the box.

SP8's
21-08-2010, 07:53 PM
Samsung are the largest producer of Plasma & LCD panels ... got a very good name and used by other "manufacturers" in their products, solely because their production volumes make them very economical. They're also at the cutting edge of technology as well, wish I could get .0005% of their R&D budget.

paulw
21-08-2010, 08:23 PM
HD ready to me means that it has gotten one or more HDMI ports but no digital tuner.. And there are plenty around like that in the shops..

John H
21-08-2010, 08:42 PM
I find the marketing to be shithouse, Each set should just be listed with its maximum display capabilities,instead they cloud the waters as much as possible. Then they plaster there marketing crap all around outside of the screen.Its all bullshit, its a damn display screen,display something, don't give us 65 instances of crap.
(snip)

That is what I am beginning to think. Why say 'HD ready' when it isn't? They should say "no matter what kind of signal you pump into this baby, it will only show 720p, and there is nothing you can do about it to make it ready to do Full HD". And pigs may fly over Eketahuna.

John H
21-08-2010, 08:44 PM
Samsung are the largest producer of Plasma & LCD panels ... got a very good name and used by other "manufacturers" in their products, solely because their production volumes make them very economical. They're also at the cutting edge of technology as well, wish I could get .0005% of their R&D budget.

Thanks SP8. I had better find a local supplier and go and look at one. Our main TV is a Toshiba - it just looked the best of the multitude of TVs on display at the time, and I haven't been disappointed in the two years we have had it.

Mind you, if I get a Full HD set, I may end up dissatisfied with the main TV. What a sod that would be...

Snorkbox
21-08-2010, 09:29 PM
Very much like an HP computer I have here in my view. Came with WinXP, 128 Megs RAM and is "broadband ready" whatever that means.

I upgraded the RAM to 512 Meg which is the maximum the M/B will take and I'll be donating it to a good home.

pcuser42
21-08-2010, 09:53 PM
Very much like an HP computer I have here in my view. Came with WinXP, 128 Megs RAM and is "broadband ready" whatever that means.

I would say it simply means the computer has an Ethernet port.

Snorkbox
21-08-2010, 10:07 PM
Probably and in fact it does. It also has USB to which I can connect an adsl modem if I'm really silly.

Agent_24
21-08-2010, 11:01 PM
Thanks SP8. I had better find a local supplier and go and look at one. Our main TV is a Toshiba - it just looked the best of the multitude of TVs on display at the time, and I haven't been disappointed in the two years we have had it.

Mind you, if I get a Full HD set, I may end up dissatisfied with the main TV. What a sod that would be...

If you're happy with your Toshiba I suggest you get another Toshiba or something not Samsung.

I don't know about their TVs but everything Samsung I have ever been associated with has either broken or has a terrible design problem regarding usability.

Samsung might be cutting edge, but that's just the problem. Too 'cutting edge' and you get cut on new technology that hasn't had time for all the problems to get ironed out.


That is what I am beginning to think. Why say 'HD ready' when it isn't? They should say "no matter what kind of signal you pump into this baby, it will only show 720p, and there is nothing you can do about it to make it ready to do Full HD". And pigs may fly over Eketahuna.

They aren't lying or anything really.

HD just means anything with a higher resolution than standard definition. 720p is included in that.

To distinguish between them, 1080p is called Full HD. When the next format comes out with 4x the pixels it will be called Quad HD.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e0/HD_vs_SD_resolutions.png

This shows a good comparison between the formats

radium
22-08-2010, 12:21 AM
But did you know... that a LCD or Plasma panel can not display an interlaced picture :illogical Interlaced is designed for CRTs as the phosphors stay lit on the screen long enought to trick the human eye into seeing an image that is all there at once when really it isn't. and interlaced signals make for reduced bandwidth for TV broadcasters.

Flat panels can accept an interlaced picture but they process it to output as a progressive scan picture - Which is still not as good as true progressive scan signal, artifacts that can be introduced during progress.

Taken from Wiki "Most modern displays, such as LCD, DLP and plasma displays, are not able to work in interlaced mode, because they are fixed-resoution displays and only support progressive scanning. In order to display interlaced signal on such displays, the two interlaced fields must be converted to one progressive frame"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinterlacing

HD Ready means that the TV has a minimum of 720 Lines of resulotion and can display a HD source. Component which is an analog signal is classed as a HD signal.
And did you know RGB is not the same as component - common myth.

Also.... SkyHDi or Freeview-HD Don't broadcast in Full HD (1080p) Because of the huge bandwidth this would use, they tend to use either 720p or 1080i... So no Full HD broadcast, you would need a now defunt HD-DVD player or a blu-ray player to get the full benefits of a 1080p panel :rolleyes:

Just some intresting points...

John H
22-08-2010, 08:37 AM
Well, thanks everyone. I now feel disambiguated, to use the lovely Wikipedia term. I am glad I asked the question, and this thread gives the answer to the other poll that I did not respond to - why do I like pressF1!

A helpful wee community so long as you stay off race, religion, and politics... :thanks

Strommer
22-08-2010, 07:23 PM
John, if you view two screens from 3m distance (or farther), one TV is full HD and the other is HD Ready, you will not be able to see the difference. The exception may be with 50 in screens or larger. At least most people cannot see any difference. Up close you can definitely see that full HD is better. Would I buy HD Ready? Probably not since it would bother me knowing it is not full HD and occasionally I would be closer than 3m. If someone is on a tight budget then an HD Ready plasma will fit the ticket. If $$ is not an issue then a 200 Hz LED screen would be the one.

Metla
22-08-2010, 08:01 PM
Meh, I plugged a Blu-Ray player into my 50" "HD ready" 1366x768 plasma, Stunning.

But, the full HD model of my television is now cheaper then what I paid for mine at Christmas time so its a bit of a moot discussion, I don't think screens less then full HD will be the norm in a very short time.,

When I bought my TV last week for the room I'm renting in Wellington I found that there was no price difference between "full HD" and HD ready" 32" LCD screens, so it was an easy decision to make.

I'm running DVD's upscaled through that screen and I give it a rating of....stunning, Revenge of the Sith was freakin awesome.

radium
22-08-2010, 08:47 PM
Our 50" Plasma is just HD Ready, You know I sell TVs that's one of my jobs, I picked HD Ready... Why? Price and value for money, and I don't want to spend a lot on redundant technology in 2 years time. Why buy a TV now to last 10 years, when you will be wanting better in 2 or 3.
We brought a Panasonic panel, one of the more reliable brands.

Is there a big difference between picture quality between HD and Full HD = No. Like I pointed our and so has someone else High def TV is only broadcast in HD not Full HD, I don't have a Blu-ray player yet, but when I do, It will still look Great.

And I couldn't justify paying the extra for a full HD model.

50" HD Ready Panasonic Plasma around $1500 Full HD $2100. However I paid nothing like that.

John H
22-08-2010, 10:34 PM
Thanks for all the thoughts. All I know is that I have had this Toshiba for a couple of years or so, and it was as good as any of the heaps of other brands on display when I bought it. I don't know what its resolution is.

A few months ago I was in Dorkland staying with my daughter, and I saw their new 32" Sony LCD TV. I was absolutely gobsmacked at the difference in quality on Sky TV between their set and our bigger one. Crisp as a cracker - I mean it was a quantum leap in quality. I wuz peed off, but then you have to buy when you decide to, not what things might be like a couple of years down the track. And of course when you get home, the old thing is fine really from across the room, especially with a whisky and a wine taken.

However, I need to find out what model she has got, because that would do me if there was a 26 inch equivalent. 32" is just too big for the room it is going in.

radium
22-08-2010, 11:00 PM
26" you needed worry about Full HD, you would hardly notice the difference. Not only that but full hd TVs that sixe are very rare

John H
22-08-2010, 11:06 PM
26" you needed worry about Full HD, you would hardly notice the difference. Not only that but full hd TVs that sixe are very rare

Thus far, I have only found on Full HD and that was a Samsung 27". I don't know if there are any 26".

Trev
22-08-2010, 11:32 PM
I run a Blu Ray player through my 30 month old 40" Sony Bravia and all I can say is brilliant. Also have a Freeview tuner hooked up to it as will (model before freeview was included.) Watching V which was broadcast in HD, on the closeup of peoples faces you could see the pores of there skin.
:)

PPp
26-08-2010, 11:23 PM
Best thing to do is go to whatever mega TV outlet, and look at the images, as mentioned the bigger TVs look better in 1080, also a faster Mhz rate helps(100Mhz looks better then 50Mhz )the higher you go the less the return. Most TVs are very reliable now so look for the best picture as there are variable levels of picture quality, even among the best brands. Freeview comes in two flavours terrestrial and satellite. Terrestrial can come in 1080 and much of it does. Satellite comes in at 750 A reasonable signal strength makes for a good picture, weak signals will cause the picture to break up. Buying a TV with freeview installed is probably cheaper, the boxes are better for analogue TVs

Twelvevolts
26-08-2010, 11:35 PM
I got a full HD Sony 40 inch (main TV) LCD and a 50 inch Samsung HD Plasma (Cinema and games). The 50 inch Plasma looks brilliant and was about a thousand cheaper than the full HD version of the same thing. In fact in the shop the one I cheaper Samsung looked way better.

Some of the features are a bit of a con, I can certainly recommend highly the Samsung 50 inch plasma for under $1400 if you don't have to have the best of everything on the market.