PDA

View Full Version : Heaters



kbp
17-08-2010, 01:44 PM
Anyone know which is the most economical and cheapest heating system to use at homes? Electricity is killing ... I use Oil fin heaters and work out so expensive. Any ideas friends?

prefect
17-08-2010, 01:44 PM
wood

kbp
17-08-2010, 01:46 PM
dont have a fireplace

Battleneter2
17-08-2010, 01:50 PM
I would say Heat Pumps are the cheapest, certainly a lot cheaper than conventional heaters, you get a lot more heat per $

Nothing beats a log burner for comfort however :p

kbp
17-08-2010, 01:58 PM
agreed but the Heat pumps are expensive to install .. friend told me he got it done for around $5k ...

Battleneter2
17-08-2010, 02:26 PM
agreed but the Heat pumps are expensive to install .. friend told me he got it done for around $5k ...

Yea somewaht true. Depends on the size of your house but a smaller house can be 3k-4K.

When you calculate the power saving it might take 8 years to get back your investment but you will be a lot more comfortable than 8 years with conventional heaters. Heat pumps are generally thought to last around 15 years, but clearly dependant on a wide range of factors, brand, usage, luck!


Going from a house some time ago with conventional electric heating to a heat pump, all i can say is if you have the money and plan to stay put, don't even think twice, you will only regret not doing it sooner.

Renmoo
17-08-2010, 02:33 PM
I still remember a very good answer posted by qazwsxokmijn quite some time ago:

http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/showpost.php?p=709080&postcount=6


Heaters. Heaters heaters heaters. Damn things suck up your electricity.

Only turn them on an hour before you go to bed an half an hour before you wake up. Use a timer to turn it on and off in intervals while you sleep.

pctek
17-08-2010, 03:21 PM
dont have a fireplace

Sad. But wood is the cheapest. Well actually coal probably is and wood second cheapest.

kbp
17-08-2010, 03:27 PM
well unfortunately they dont build fireplaces in new homes.

Nomad
17-08-2010, 05:58 PM
our winter bills were up to $500/mo when we had oil fin heaters, this year it has not toppled $250/mo. we put in a heat pump for the lounge. we used to have like 2x 2300W oil fin heaters going like 8hr a day. we also put in insulation but the lounge does not have cos the ceiling is too high - no attic.

now we still have the odd oil fin in the bedrooms.
cheapest IMO is really just putting it on a low setting like the oil fins might have 1 bar or 2 bar or both on = 3bars. try to use 1 bar only and wear a sweater like a merino top, trackpants and socks. duvet jackts are also quite nice too and comfy, thermals can be tight.

all heaters IMO are the same, oil fin IMO heats the room more uniformly than a fan or radiant heater. but they are all the same cost, electric heaters are 100% efficient, 1kW of electricity provides 1kW of heater (1,000W), so a 2.3kW heater cost maybe 2.3 x 20c a kW (these days) per hour if you have it at full whack.

i've seen heat pumps for around $1,600 depending on the size of your room, we have a 5kW I think with a 2-3m high ceiling. if you don't you could get a 2kW I guess. we have ours heating the lounge and the dining room. installation cost varies $500-800 depending how far away you need to fit the exterior unit.

Nomad
17-08-2010, 06:01 PM
the floor standing are much more $$. like a 4.5kW, may cost $3-5k, while the high wall cost maybe $2k. depends on the size of the room, you could get 6 or 8kW if you want. or put two in a large room i have seen on TV.

Nomad
17-08-2010, 06:05 PM
I still remember a very good answer posted by qazwsxokmijn quite some time ago:

http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/showpost.php?p=709080&postcount=6

seriously it hasn't been this cold recently, june july was a bit cold with the frost but then again some of you are in Auckland :D i am looking at the snow mountain and it has a lack of snow, it looks like November last year now. i don't use the heater in the mornings, shower, breakie and jump out at 6.45am for my bus. with insulation it has taken the chill out.

don't forget that insulation and heat pumps get govt assistance. also that panasonic heat pumps get a cash credit on your account if you are with genesis. we found contact $$ anyway ....

you may also wanna consider going to a composite power meter, it's cheaper than the usual one - which is 24hr on demand. composite does let them control your electricity water, but if you are with gas, on a technical note you can go on composite (get the cheaper rates) and not affect your water cos it's gas :clap: you do have to pay for the meter change however.

maybe changing your lifestyle, all bingle into the lounge, eg., if you have a fridge in the garage that is hardly used, it may cost $12/mo, a chest freezer perhaps $8. so they all add up. if you have multiple heaters in many rooms, tvs, pc's, stereos, consoles they add up.

bathroom heaters too cos they are a powerful 2,400W, rangehoods the same, hairdryers, microwaves, vacuum cleaners, food processors ........

the easiest way is really, daytime don't use heaters, jump around, walk around, don't use multiple heaters in a single room, get a clothes dryer and not use a extra heater for the clothes. to heat the whole hosue it's pricey. corridors etc etc ..

it's so nice for adults and kids to come home and put the heaters onto full whack and get it very cosy, enof for it to feel like summer, walk around in shorts barefoot jump on the sofa plays the console or watch tv / movies and have this filtered to the kitch an dining room and in every bedroom and corridor. but ouch ...

lakewoodlady
17-08-2010, 06:20 PM
well unfortunately they dont build fireplaces in new homes.


If you are renting the house, the landlord is now legally obliged to provide some type of heating. If that is your case, is it the oil fin ones he/she has supplied?

If you own the house, heat pump is the way to go. or even a flued gas fire is better than oil fins, imho.

LL

Nomad
17-08-2010, 06:24 PM
the best way to heat a home IMO is a heat pump in the lounge - high wall cos much cheaper than the floor units. so one there. let it filter into the dining room is ok, other times shut the door.

put one in the corridor of the bedrooms, close the windows in winter for the laundry and bathrooms, if there is a corridor that leads away to unknown lands, block that off with a door or thermal curtians. so much cheaper installing one in each room and running individual heaters in each room. and perhaps one in the master bedroom.

edit. it's just so nice with heaters eh .. we didn't have thermos, but i guess the temp was like 30 degrees :p with little humidity, fantastic. now with the HP, we have ours at 24 cos 20 is a bit cold unless you have a sweater and stuff .. but guestimating to get it as warm as before maybe 28-30, haha. but HP are much cheaper to run.

pctek
17-08-2010, 06:27 PM
If you are renting the house, the landlord is now legally obliged to provide some type of heating.

No they aren't.

lakewoodlady
17-08-2010, 07:01 PM
No they aren't.

I am pretty sure, but will do some more research on the subject.

LL

lakewoodlady
17-08-2010, 07:13 PM
Ok, sorry looks like this didn't go through. I thought it had.
http://www.votemenot.co.nz/thread/343153/landlords-do-have-to-provide-heating/

LL

mikebartnz
17-08-2010, 11:23 PM
wood
Wood is not the cheapest unless you have an easily available supply and aren't paying for it.

Nomad
18-08-2010, 02:33 PM
just got our last bill $250 odd I think. When we didn't have the HPs in summer the bill was already $180 ish. Now someone wants them outside the 3 bedrooms :D

We have 3 chest freezers and a fridge/freezer in the garage in addition to the 1 in the kitch.

prefect
18-08-2010, 04:38 PM
I live in Auckland and wood here is free, get it from pallets in summer and Concourse free wood in Winter. Also the timber framers cant get rid of 4 x 2 offcuts in summer its only lightly eco treated.
Sure in the depths of Winter the wood is going to have some value but be like the squirrel and prepare.

Gobe1
18-08-2010, 04:45 PM
Heatpumps suck, not just electricity either
Cant beat a good woodburner....

Trev
18-08-2010, 05:53 PM
For having a heatpump against having a woodburner.
No fire to light.
No wood to bring inside.
No mess to cleanup, like bark sawdust on the carpet.
No chimney to get cleaned.
No wood to buy.
No ashes to empty out.
:)

prefect
18-08-2010, 07:33 PM
Against:
A zillion dollar power bill.

Trev
18-08-2010, 07:45 PM
Against:
A zillion dollar power bill.
No.
:)

zqwerty
18-08-2010, 08:28 PM
Since Mum got heat pump bill seems to have dropped by $100 from $350 down to $250 approx, will give better figures at end of Winter.

martynz
18-08-2010, 08:40 PM
well unfortunately they dont build fireplaces in new homes.

You don't need a built-in fireplace to instal a wood burning stove.

tweak'e
18-08-2010, 09:26 PM
For having a heatpump against having a woodburner.
No fire to light.
No wood to bring inside.
No mess to cleanup, like bark sawdust on the carpet.
No chimney to get cleaned.
No wood to buy.
No ashes to empty out.
:)

against: freezing your **** off when the power goes out.

i can never understand why people, especially in snow country, rely on power for heating.

jareemon
18-08-2010, 10:04 PM
I find that i dont need a warmer house if i just do 10 pressup and crunches every half an hour that keeps me warm as :)
Also, have a look into an HRV system.

Trev
18-08-2010, 10:37 PM
against: freezing your **** off when the power goes out.

i can never understand why people, especially in snow country, rely on power for heating.
Had a heatpump for 8 years, never had a power cut yet. Touches wood.
:)

Battleneter2
19-08-2010, 02:24 PM
Against:
A zillion dollar power bill.

Actually I am in CHCH, our Heat Pump adds about $80 a month over summer power bills. I know people with log burners who spend around $500 over the 3 winter months on wood, so nearly twice as expensive.

We don't run our Heap pump 24/7 like some however, and log burners are run longer and more cosey. Its a tricky comparison but Heat pumps are def cheaper unless you have access to cheap wood.

prefect
19-08-2010, 02:36 PM
Like most when the log burner is heating the house it heats the hot water for free and drys the clothes and the fuel for is it free in Auckland. My power bill drops in the Winter.
Hardly a rocket scientist decision here.

SKT174
19-08-2010, 03:23 PM
For having a heatpump against having a woodburner.
No fire to light.
No wood to bring inside.
No mess to cleanup, like bark sawdust on the carpet.
No chimney to get cleaned.
No wood to buy.
No ashes to empty out.
:)

x 2 ~

plus it keeps the humidity of the house dry. No condensation on windows.

My study have 2 computers running 24/7, when I get home I switch on my desktop as well, that room is really warm. No heater needed.

I also checked that with ALL my Computer, Routers, LCD, Speakers and what not, it uses approx 485W.

tweak'e
19-08-2010, 07:12 PM
Had a heatpump for 8 years, never had a power cut yet. Touches wood.
:)

just about every year i see on tv somewhere down south there are out of power for a week due to snow and ice. its generally in the crappy weather when power goes out, right when you need to be warm.

mikebartnz
20-08-2010, 09:36 AM
I find that i dont need a warmer house if i just do 10 pressup and crunches every half an hour that keeps me warm as :)
Also, have a look into an HRV system.
HRV are over priced for what they are and do.

jareemon
20-08-2010, 10:47 AM
I disagree. They keep your home very dry and warm using solar energy, reducing heating costs not only because the energy is from the sun, but also because the house is drier and so the house is always heated far more efficiently. They keep every nook and cranny dry, and reduce condensation almost completely, they use bugger all power, and some models evel cool the house in the summer.

Battleneter2
20-08-2010, 11:13 AM
I disagree. They keep your home very dry and warm using solar energy, reducing heating costs not only because the energy is from the sun, but also because the house is drier and so the house is always heated far more efficiently. They keep every nook and cranny dry, and reduce condensation almost completely, they use bugger all power, and some models evel cool the house in the summer.

There are like 15 HRV or similar systems sold in NZ. I would only consider a model that has a heat exchanger pulling fresh are from the outside not the attic.

They do keep your house drier no debate and a little cheaper to heat, but many heat pumps have a dehumidify type mode also. HRV and simliar do not "heat" on cold clouded over days where there is no sun as can be proven by a trip to your attic (unless you have a worthless heat module which scoffs power)

I considered a system this winter but I realised for like $3,500 it will take like a decade+ to recover the cost over just running the heat pump harder excluding compounding interest on the money.

mikebartnz
21-08-2010, 08:22 PM
I disagree. They keep your home very dry and warm using solar energy, reducing heating costs not only because the energy is from the sun, but also because the house is drier and so the house is always heated far more efficiently. They keep every nook and cranny dry, and reduce condensation almost completely, they use bugger all power, and some models evel cool the house in the summer.
I wont deny the benefits but they are definitely over priced by about a thousand when you consider what is involved.

R2x1
22-08-2010, 01:30 AM
The best thing about HRV systems is that by pumping air from room to roof, or vice versa they cut down stress and wear on your ceiling insulation, which now has the same temperature on both sides. ;) :banana :banana

Nomad
22-08-2010, 09:28 AM
We have a small dehumidifier, it's on the noisy side ... not sure how the others are like thou ... having seen a DVR system in Placemakers I couldn't even hear it.....

jareemon
22-08-2010, 09:37 AM
I wont deny the benefits but they are definitely over priced by about a thousand when you consider what is involved.
agreed.

The best thing about HRV systems is that by pumping air from room to roof, or vice versa they cut down stress and wear on your ceiling insulation, which now has the same temperature on both sides. ;) :banana :banana
LOL

PPp
26-08-2010, 11:43 PM
Heat pumps work more efficiently if it is not too cold, at 5 below there is not much heat to pump and you have to defrost the collector unit often to make it work properly. I have friends and relations in Christchurch and in both places the heat pump performance really drops when the temperature goes below zero. Unfortunatly fires are not too popular down there due to the pollution caused.